WILD, BLUE YONDER

Poetry by Benikranus Appaw

Wild, Blue Yonder

If we could all fly, where would we go?
Before man was cursed to adapt,
cuddled up under the coldest nights
& run naked on hot days,
we had freedom to move with just wishful thinking and simply being present.

If we could all fly, where would we go?
How low can you fall when we are already high?
High above ground with our eyes closed,
breathing in the angelic presence that we call nature,
the reflection of light as it hits certain parts of our soul we want seen.
we can’t control or decide what tomorrow brings
in this moment, here and now,
we would fly and live every moment before it escapes.

If we could all fly, where would we go?
Would we still pause to gaze at the beautiful blue skies or get startled as we watch the Sun rises to replace the Moon?
Would we still take pleasures in the little falls we make when we try but fail?
oh! what beauty and righteous life we would live in surrender to the wind and magic that lies beyond the clouds

If we could all fly, where would we go?
We would fall, freely, like leaves in autumn.
Swing through trees like butterflies yearning for nectar.
We would spread our wings like birds,
never finding quiet the right place to settle down.
But why would we need to settle, WE CAN FLY!

Bio
Benikranus is a Ghanaian born writer, health advocate and Nursing Officer by profession. Her works have been published in the 2020 Ghana writes Christmas/New year Haiku and Senryu series, Voices of African Women JOURNAL and African Global Networks.
She draws inspiration from her experiences, culture and imaginations which embodies her fears and joy, relationships and social issues.
She currently resides and works in Accra, Ghana and in her free time writes poetry on Instagram under the pseudonym @pen.cells

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About Tampered Press

Tampered press started out as a conversation on creating more platform and visibility for writers and visual artists in Ghana and Africa. While blackness has become more noticeable now than in the past, and more space is gradually being created at the table 

black as an identity is heavily nuanced and has to be dissected and carefully documented. African artists in particular have fewer platforms. Our experiences, mannerisms and culture often have similarities, but our style, design, creation and content are different.