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DEATH BY HEARTBREAK
Fiction by Briana Korletey “Amma, take the chicken out of the freezer and let it thaw,” My mother barked as she wrapped the cloth around her waist. "Don’t forget or I will…
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WILD, BLUE YONDER
Poetry by Benikranus Appaw Wild, Blue Yonder If we could all fly, where would we go? Before man was cursed to adapt, cuddled up under the coldest nights & run naked on…
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MOTORWAY
Fiction by Teddy Totimeh Motorway There was a certain excitement when I got off the airplane into the blanket of sweltering heat on a May evening in Accra. The heat had that…
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SOMETHING IN THE WATER
Poetry by Sihle Ntuli Something in the Water there is something down there, biding its time / under a bridge / I struggle to cross indecipherable  language of  rivers serenades of running…
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WON’T YOU EAT AGAIN?
Fiction by Akorfa Dawson WON’T YOU EAT AGAIN? We used to eat together in one big bowl, all of us: the six Baidoo children. Immediately you see us anywhere, no one needs…
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SEEING ME
Poetry by Lemuel Nortey SEEING ME I become the walking idea Of what you love, And then I fall in love with who I become for you, Through the haze of it…
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Issue No. 5

None of us quite expected to be real-time witnesses of a pandemic. But in the year of 2020, as the universe saw it fit, a pandemic enveloped the world. And with it…

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Parkour
Fiction by Elfreda Tetteh 1 On the day that Johnson falls, he is thinking of heading to the bridge. During the class break, he stands outside and tries to fold himself in…
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A Written Misconception
Fiction by Nana Yaa Osei Every day that I don’t write is laced with an echo of regret. It pains my children that I have not traced my emotions, ideas and thoughts…

About Tampered Press

Tampered press started out as a conversation on creating more platform and visibility for writers and visual artists in Ghana and Africa. While blackness has become more noticeable now than in the past, and more space is gradually being created at the table 

black as an identity is heavily nuanced and has to be dissected and carefully documented. African artists in particular have fewer platforms. Our experiences, mannerisms and culture often have similarities, but our style, design, creation and content are different.